Finally Free & Home With the Family!                                                                               

Subtitle

 People Who Qualify for a Parole Grant

Name & Inmate Number: Cory M. Harris #223305

Institution: Fox Lake Correctional Institution

Crime Committed: Party to Crime Armed Robbery

Sentence: 25 Years

Time Served: 21 Years

Parole Eligibility Date:

Parole Denials : 7

Next Parole Review: February 2020

Security Status/Institutional Adjustment: Medium Security

Additional Info: Brother, Uncle and friend looking to successfully return to society and work. This is a dear situation for me. Cory, is my younger brother. Good hearted, and respectful gentle giant misunderstood. Yet, easier to label. He definitely has a support system with many opportunities awaiting him. Please help me bring my brother home.

Name & Inmate Number: Marshawn Vanzant #317446

Institution: Oakhill Correctional Institution

Crime Committed: Bank Robbery while Armed & Reckless Endangering Safety (no victim injuries)

Sentence: 43 Years

Time Served: 22 Years

Parole Eligibility Date:

Parole Denials: 8 

Next Parole Review: May 2019

Security Status/Institutional Adjustment: Minimum with Work Release

Additional Info: There was a time when I used to smile. Because there was hope. There was strength. There was belief in a future… Of course over time doing time, and watching time, feeling time misuse you. You can’t help but begin to see things differently. It definitely hard to understand for anyone whom hasn’t stood in these shoes of mine that have travelled this journey. To have error in life, recognition of that error, and grow from it. Yet, be subject to regret in a mature mind about what I foolishly have done in my adolescence. Growing old with this pain that it seems I can’t receive the mercy of forgiveness for. Time heals, time also reforms. Time allows for maturity, Time evolves. Time changes feelings, and minds even. Yet, it seems I have been thrown away. This doesn’t appear to be GOD fearing, or evening humane. Rationalizing a life away shouldn’t be as easy as rubber stamps; Insufficient time served; said in no more than 15 minutes to tell me that I don’t exist, shouldn’t exist, and never will be allowed to exist. Insufficient, and not enough time, my family cries. I cry, and secretly die a little inside while my daughter asks why? Again, again… He should of never done what he did. They should of never committed the sins that they did…

I was born in the USA, the land of the Opportunities. Where we are all taught to give, and forgive. I’ve learned more of how to practice this virtue during these years served. Has the Correctional system done away with them? Has society done such a thing? I can’t help but to feel helpless, sad and disappointed defined by time that they call a clock on my cell brick wall… Insufficient?

Tell me what is sufficient? After twenty years, and obvious adjustment, repenting heart, and all. What is sufficient, humane, or simply, enough, and not cruel, and unusual?

Name & Inmate Number: Al Curtis #234033

Institution: Oakhill Correctional Institution

Crime Committed: Party to a Crime 1st Degree Reckless (16yrs) 1st Degree Reckless (11yrs) and Possession of a short shotgun (8yrs)

Sentence: 51 Years

Time Served: 29 Years

Parole Eligibility Date:

Parole Denials:

Next Parole Review: August 2019

Security Status/Institutional Adjustment: Minimum, All Program Needs Met, currently on Work Release

Additional Info: Father to 2 daughters and grandfather

Name & Inmate Number: Ramiah Whiteside #243376

Crime Committed: Vehicle homicide

Sentence: 47 Years

Time Served: 24 Years

Parole Eligibility Date:

Parole Denials : 10

Next Parole Review: February 2019

Security Status/Institutional Adjustment: Minimum (work release pending)

Additional Info: Sentencing Judge, David A. Hansher fully supports my release, I earned over 40 credits towards social work degree. I have obtained my drivers license, and all treatment program needs have been met. I am a certified vocational baker and I have maintained employment throughout my incarceration.